uncrate:

Absinthexplore Kits

This looks fun, but would it have killed them to throw in a couple sugar cubes as well? This reminds me, though, I really need to pick up one of them fancy spoons.

Collecting barware gadgets is one of my favorite parts of drinking fancy cocktails.

Q

Anonymous asked:

So I just saw your blog mentioned on last year's Christmas episode of Working Class Foodies as a "mostly cocktails blog". Do you still blog about cocktails or has the blog evolved past that?

A

Hey, thanks for stopping by! This is my personal blog, so it’s kind of a mish-mash of stuff, y’know? I only got on WCF because I’m friends with Rebecca and she knows I like to put together drinks on occasion.

I do still blog about the drinks I’m making at home from time to time, but I’ve been too poor (and a little un-inspired) lately to buy fixings for fancy cocktails. Plus, I’ve moved on to a wine phase over the past few months out of sheer laziness (pouring a glass of wine is so easy, y’all!) and the fact that I moved to California and there’s alotta wine to get into here. But, I digress…

You can see a backlog of cocktail recipes I’ve made by clicking on posts tagged 'happy hour' and 'cocktail'.  

Oh yeah, and I have also turned my attention to slawblogging lately. So there’s that. I guess I kind of have ADD about the sort of content I keep putting out into the world??

Shit, now I feel like I should get back into blogging about cocktails…

I think it’s safe to say, this one was a big hit. Don’t think I got a picture of the finished product, but it was equally as pretty as it was tasty.
Secret Mix is as follows (shh! don’t tell anyone!):
Juice of 12 limes (approx 9-12oz lime juice)
1 1/2 cups of sugar
Half a nutmeg, freshly grated
1 1/4 oz Angostura bitters
Stir until the sugar dissolves and stick it in the fridge a couple of hours to let the flavors meld. Let me tell you, juicing this many limes is a pain in the butt! While I prefer fresh juice, I’d suggest getting packaged lime juice and sparing your dominant arm the torment.

I think it’s safe to say, this one was a big hit. Don’t think I got a picture of the finished product, but it was equally as pretty as it was tasty.

Secret Mix is as follows (shh! don’t tell anyone!):

  • Juice of 12 limes (approx 9-12oz lime juice)
  • 1 1/2 cups of sugar
  • Half a nutmeg, freshly grated
  • 1 1/4 oz Angostura bitters

Stir until the sugar dissolves and stick it in the fridge a couple of hours to let the flavors meld. Let me tell you, juicing this many limes is a pain in the butt! While I prefer fresh juice, I’d suggest getting packaged lime juice and sparing your dominant arm the torment.

Happy Hour: Borden Chase
(Original Recipe)

  • 2 1/4 oz blended scotch whiskey
  • 3/4 oz sweet vermouth
  • 1/2 tsp Pernod (or the pastis / anise-flavored liqueur of your choice - I used Ricard)
  • 2 dashes orange bitters

Shake with ice, strain into coupe glass. This recipe made slightly more liquid than I had space for in my coupe - so beware!

First, don’t make the mistake I did. I used single-malt scotch (left over from a previous recipe), instead of a blended scotch. Single malt scotch does not play well with other flavors, but I was feeling experimental - plus, I am looking for ways to use up this bottle of scotch.

I am sure this would be really lovely with some Johnnie Walker, but I’ll have to critique the cocktail based on what I used. It was kind of weird. The smoky scotch with the herbal pastis was rough on the first sip. But, with most boozy drinks, everything seems to work a little better by the third or fourth sip.

I would really like to try this again once I pick up a blended scotch whiskey.

I feel like odd combos are going to be the tone of the week, since I am trying my hardest to find recipes that call for scotch. I frankly don’t know what to do with it - other than drink it neat, or on ice, obviously (boring)!  Stick around for more scotch craziness coming up soon.

Just added 11 new cocktails to my To-Do list, and am super stoked to share them with you in the coming weeks.

In addition, I am happy to take requests or take on a challenge (ie: tell me you have one or two ingredients and I’ll figure out something tasty for you to mix up that includes your requirements). Just leave me a message in my ASK section.

Ladies Night: Dinner and a movie

Justin is out of town all week, so I thought it would be nice to have some of my girls over for dinner. We made a couple cocktails, had some supper, and watched Pootie Tang (one of the the best comedies to ever comedy, in my opinion).

Beth brought over some bubbly and we got down to business. First, she whipped up a mix of rye, lemon juice, bitters and maple syrup. It was a nice mix for fall (and jokingly called the Master Cleanse of cocktails). Then I tried out the classic Seelbach.

Seelbach
1 oz bourbon
1/2 oz Cointreau
7 dashes Angostura bitters
7 dashes Peychaud’s bitters
top with champagne

You can see the result in the champagne flute. I wasn’t wild about this one, but I blame the fact that I didn’t have Angostura on hand. Here’s something I’ve learned: You can substitute one liquor for a similiar liquor in a recipe, but don’t mess with the called-for bitters. That stuff is too variable from one brand to the next.

Next, I made a gin-based drink, called The London.

The London
2 oz gin
3/4 oz Lillet Blanc
1/2 oz grapefruit juice
top with champagne

Serve in a coupe glass with a sugared rim. This was better - very fresh and light, but I still felt like something was missing. I find grapefruit to be too bitter for my tastes, so if I were to make this again, I would add a little sugar to sweeten it up.

The movie was hilar, and the company even better. Thanks, ladies, I had a wonderful time tonight. Cheers!

Here’s what is currently available at the home bar today.
This cute chalkboard was a house-warming gift from my parents when Justin and I moved to Williamsburg a year ago. You can get it online for $30!
So yes, I might be a little hypocritical for making fun of hipsters, what with my twee fancy homemade cocktails. BUT, I never serve up drinks dressed like a 1920s paperboy with a handlebar mustache. You can count on that!

Here’s what is currently available at the home bar today.

This cute chalkboard was a house-warming gift from my parents when Justin and I moved to Williamsburg a year ago. You can get it online for $30!

So yes, I might be a little hypocritical for making fun of hipsters, what with my twee fancy homemade cocktails. BUT, I never serve up drinks dressed like a 1920s paperboy with a handlebar mustache. You can count on that!

A note on syrups for cocktails

Simple syrup is one of the most basic, multi-use items that every home bartender should have on-hand. Thankfully, it really is SIMPLE to make! Let’s take a look at the basic recipe for making it, then I’ll give you some suggestions for easy modifications you can make to really wow your friends (and your own tastebuds).

Simple Syrup

1 part sugar
1 part water

Put sugar and water into a small pot, and heat over low heat. Once the sugar has completely dissolved, turn off the heat and let cool completely. Put it in the fridge and it should keep for about a month or so. For home use, 1/2 cup to 1 cup of each is enough to last you a while. If you’re hosting a big party, 3 cups of each should last you the whole night.

Easy ways to jazz up your simple syrup

Herbs - I LOVE adding a handful of mint (perfect for mojitos) or basil to simple syrup. Once the sugar has dissolved, add your herbs and simmer for a few more minutes before you take the syrup off the burner to cool. Once cool, strain out the leaves. You’re good to go! If you have other herbs you love, give them a try too - you can’t go wrong.

Fruit - Toss in whole raspberries or strawberries (frozen works just as well!) while you’re heating up your syrup. If you prefer citrus, use lemon/lime/orange peels to flavor your syrup. Cool, strain, you know the deal.

Grenadine - This is just a fancy word for pomegranate syrup. Harvest the seeds (or better yet, buy them already loose to save yourself the trouble) from a pomegranate, then add them to your sugar and water. Heat until the pomegranate seeds burst and color your syrup bright red. Cool, strain, refrigerate.

Honey - Instead of sugar, use equal parts honey and water.

There are hundreds of ways to make simple syrup your own. You can even mix and match (basil + lemon = delicious). So, get creative and look into your fridge for inspiration!

There are no hard and fast rules as to how much of each item you should throw in. Usually a handful or two is enough - plus the longer you let the syrup sit while it’s cooling, the stronger the flavor will end up being. Play around, use your imagination and have fun!